Coal 2017 Conference Will Focus on Environment and the Economy

As coal continues to be the subject of intense focus around the world, experts from Canada and around the world will gather in Vancouver From September 27-29 to discuss coal, the environment and the economy.

Centred around the theme “A Sustainable Future: Coal and the Environment”, the 2017 conference boasts an exceptional lineup of industry leaders, scholars and experts from around the world who will share their insights in presentations and panels focusing on the theme of the economy and the environment.

Keynote speaker will be Ernie Thrasher, a well-known figure in the coal sector. Mr. Thrasher is the founder of XCoal, the largest exporter of US coal to Asia and has held various positions in mine operations and mine management, as well as marketing, over the last 40 years.

The banquet keynote speaker will be Dr. Jack Mintz, a renowned Canadian economist. Dr. Mintz is the President’s Fellow of the School of Public Policy at the University of Calgary. He will be speaking at the Annual awards dinner on September 28, where the CAC will be presenting the Award of Distinction to researcher Ross Leeder.

The moderator for this year is Bob Bell, Mr. Bell held executive positions with companies in both the metallurgical and thermal coal industries including Luscar Ltd., Pine Valley Mining, Teck Resources, Ram River Coal and Atrum Coal.  In addition, he served two terms as Chair of Neptune Bulk Terminals.  He currently runs a consulting practice focused on marketing and transportation strategy, product evaluation and property development.  Conference speakers this year represent not only the coal industry, but regulators, government and the environment sector. A full list of speakers and their topics is available on coal2017.ca.

The coal industry is a significant contributor to the Canadian economy, and is responsible for nearly 42 000 jobs across Canada. Coal mining contributes $5.2 billion in direct and indirect impacts to the economy annually. The Coal Association of Canada is a national membership organization representing the coal industry and those affected by it, including miners, unions, shippers, and municipalities.

Additional information on the full conference program and speakers can be viewed at http://www.coal2017.ca/.

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Note to editors:

Media interested in attending the 2017 conference can learn more about accreditation from the conference media page.

For more information:

Sarah Hamilton
Coal Association of Canada
(780) 903-5752

 

Coal Association of Canada honours industry pioneer and researcher Ross Leeder

The Coal Association of Canada is pleased to announce Dr. Ross Leeder as the 2017 Award of Distinction Winner. The CAC Award of Distinction recognizes individuals who have demonstrated exceptional accomplishments in the coal industry in Canada.

Dr. Leeder is being recognized for his research and advocacy contributing to the coal industry. Throughout his career, Dr. Leeder has worked to develop better International Standards for Canadian coals. In his work with CANMET, Dr. Leeder’s research established the value of Canadian coal, which improved international trade, and contributed to the growth and development of Canada’s metallurgical coal trade.

He has been a member of the Canadian Carbonization Research Association (CCRA) for over 40 years and has served as Chairman of their Technical Committee and their Board of Directors. He has authored numerous reports, publications and presentations over his career, always emphasizing the technical merits of Canadian coals. Dr. Leeder is highly regarded around the world for his expertise in all technical aspects of coal including exploration, mining, processing, transportation, storage, and utilization.

He worked with many coal mining companies in western Canada on all aspects of mining, processing and beneficiation technologies, but specifically to improve technologies to upgrade Canadian coals. Over the past 30 years, Dr. Leeder has worked for several coal companies, always championing Canadian coals in the International market place.

The Award of Distinction is awarded annually at the Coal Association of Canada’s Annual Conference, which will be at the Westin Bayshore in Vancouver. The Award of Distinction presentation will be during the conference banquet dinner on September 28, 2017.

To nominate a coal industry leader for 2018, visit the Coal Association of Canada’s Award of Distinction web page.

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Note to editors:
Media interested in attending the 2017 conference presentations from September 28-29, 2017 can do so if accredited. Visit the conference media page for more information.

For more information:

Sarah Hamilton
Director of Communications and Media Relations
Coal Association of Canada
o. (780) 757 – 9488
m. (780) 903 – 5752

Coal Association of Canada sends letter to PM Trudeau regarding proposed thermal coal ban

May 5, 2017 — The Coal Association of Canada has sent a letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau asking him not to allow a ban or carbon-based levy on thermal coal transport through British Columbia.  [Read more…]

CAC statement on BC Premier Clark’s proposed thermal coal levy

May 2, 2017 — Today, Premier Christy Clark proposed a $70 per tonne carbon tax on all thermal coal shipments traveling through British Columbia, regardless of the point of origin. Premier Clark’s proposed thermal coal levy would not only impact our business with the United States, but it would impact thermal coal being shipped from Alberta as well. This is type of policy-making is not in the spirit of the barrier-free trade and would have significant impacts on coal production outside of B.C.

It would be unfortunate to see these longstanding business relationships – which create jobs and economic opportunity to British Columbians, Albertans, and Canadians at large – become a casualty of heated political rhetoric in the final legs of an election campaign. We would encourage Premier Clark to reconsider her position on this egregious levy.

Media Contact

Sarah Hamilton
Director of Communications and Media Relations
hamilton@coal.ca
(780) 903-5752

CAC Members receive 10% off registration at Coal Trans USA

CAC members are eligible to receive 10% of registration at the 17th Coal Trans USA in Miami from February 2-3, 2017. Register here. [Read more…]

Coal Association of Canada statement on Alberta coal phase-out

December 1, 2016 The Coal Association of Canada wishes to acknowledge the resolution of the coal-phase out in Alberta.

While the Alberta government has celebrated this agreement as providing “clarity and certainty” for the electricity companies, it does not provide clarity or certainty to the 10 000 families and workers in coal mining communities and those in other parts of the province that depend on a healthy mining industry who will be deeply affected by this decision over the next 14 years.

“In their own words, the government has admitted that the jobs that will replace the good, union, coal mining jobs are not direct replacements,” said Robin Campbell, President of the Coal Association of Canada, “From our experience in other jurisdictions, these jobs won’t come back.”

“We look forward to providing the government with input and guidance on how to help these communities transition.”

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Media Contact:

Sarah Hamilton
Director of Communications and Media Relations
Coal Association of Canada
(780) 903-5752
Hamilton@coal.ca

Coal Association of Canada Honours Industry Pioneer and Geologist – Madeleine Suska

EDMONTON – The Coal Association of Canada is pleased to announce Madeleine Suska, P. Geol. as the 2016 Award of Distinction Winner. The CAC Award of Distinction recognizes individuals who have demonstrated exceptional accomplishments in the coal industry in Canada.

Born in Poland, Suska graduated with a Bachelor of Science from the University of London. Starting in the oil and gas industry as a sedimentary geologist with many successful discoveries and predictions, Madeleine moved on to field exploration and mapping, later completing her Master of Science in Geology at the University of Alberta.

Suska took months-long horseback expeditions into the unmapped and unexplored lands of northeastern British Columbia and the eastern slopes of Alberta. She discovered and mapped major coal fields in BC and Alberta. These discoveries led to decades of further exploration and development, and most notably mining of the Northeast British Columbia Coal Block, including the Tumbler Ridge area.

Madeleine has been mapping, planning, negotiating, and promoting the coal industry since the 1950s, and is still active today.

The Award of Distinction is awarded annually at the Coal Association of Canada’s Annual Conference, which will be at the Westin Bayshore in Vancouver. The Award of Distinction presentation will be during the conference banquet dinner on June 9.

To nominate a coal industry leader for 2017, visit the Coal Association of Canada’s Award of Distinction web page.

Note to editors:
Media interested in attending the 2016 conference and the Award presentations on June 9 can do so if accredited. Visit the conference media page for more information.

For more information:
Sarah Hamilton
Director of Communications and Media Relations
Coal Association of Canada
o. (780) 757 – 9488
m. (780) 903 – 5752

Coal Association of Canada and American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity Statement on Meeting between Minister Catherine McKenna and EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy

 

April 7, 2016 – As Environment and Climate Change Minister Catherine McKenna and EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy meet today, the Coal Association of Canada and the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity urge Canadians to carefully watch the talks.

“It’s notable that Ms. McCarthy’s plan to phase out coal in the US is being held to intense scrutiny in the US Supreme court,” says Robin Campbell, President of the Coal Association of Canada, “Canadians have been significantly impacted by regulations in the US that affect our ability to get resources to market. While climate change policy is of significant importance to both countries, the market access issue also needs to be addressed.”

“While it is important that their discussions focus on the impact of climate change on indigenous communities, it’s worth noting that the resource sector in Canada is the greatest employer of indigenous people in Canada, and protecting jobs is our top priority,” Campbell continued, “Ms. McCarthy’s endorsement of carbon capture and sequestration technologies is a made-in-Canada solution to providing affordable and reliable power to Canadians while maintaining the jobs and communities that sustain this country. We look forward to meeting with Minister McKenna to discuss this innovative and moderate approach to the coal mining and power industry.”

The American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity cautions Canadians, citing McCarthy’s role in the US coal phase out.

“Our neighbors to the north would be well advised to listen carefully to what EPA Commissioner Gina McCarthy isn’t saying as she makes her pitch for reducing emissions in Canada. For instance, she’s not likely to talk about how her own plan, here in the United States, has been halted by the land’s highest court as its legality is questionable, at best. Nor will McCarthy talk about how her plan will cost more than $300 billion yet reduce global temperature rise by less than .01 degree,” said Laura Sheehan, senior vice president of communications for the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity. 

“It’s also interesting to hear McCarthy talk about the importance of research & development and new technologies to burn coal and other fossil fuels cleaner, given her policies at home placed a de facto ban on furthering critical development of carbon capture and sequestration. So while McCarthy talks a good game today up North, we encourage her audiences to keep their ears open and ask if what they are hearing is too good to be true.”

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Media Contact:

Sarah Hamilton
Director of Communication and Media Relations
Coal Association of Canada
hamilton@coal.ca
(780) 903-5752
Laura Sheehan
Senior Vice President of Communications
American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity
lsheehan@americaspower.org
(202) 459-4867

Coal Association of Canada launches ACT campaign to advocate for employees, communities, and consumers left behind by Climate Leadership Plan

March 31, 2016

EDMONTON — The Coal Association of Canada officially launched ACT for the Future today, a campaign aimed at protecting Alberta’s coal communities and advocating for Alberta’s electricity consumers.

“We’ve been traveling across Alberta this past month, talking to Albertans about the impacts of the government’s proposed Plan and one theme emerged— Albertans are willing to do their part to address climate change, but not on the backs of communities, workers and their families,” said Robin Campbell, President of the Coal Association of Canada. “Albertans are resourceful people, but overwhelmingly, people we’ve talked to believe there has to be balance and fairness, and a more thoughtful transition. Shuttering an industry that supports small towns within a two to 15 year window is just not fair.”

The ACT for the Future team has been conducting public information sessions on the impact of the Climate Leadership Plan and asking for feedback from communities on how the proposed changes would affect quality of life, community viability and business investment. Communities visited to date include Grande Cache, Edson, Warburg, Wabamun, Stony Plain, Forestburg, Hanna, Rocky Mountain House and Crowsnest Pass. While the early sessions are complete, ACT for the Future will try to visit any community that requests a presentation.

Coal generates over 50 percent of Alberta’s electricity and the Climate Leadership Plan proposes replacing two-thirds of Alberta’s current coal-fired generation capacity with renewables and one-third with natural gas by 2030.  The government also plans to impose a new carbon tax of $$20/tonne in 2017 and $30/tonne of CO2 emissions in 2018 that will impact the lifestyles of all Albertans.  Details of how the $2.5 to $3 billion raised by the tax will be used remain as uncertain as the government’s assurance of offsets for consumers and impacted municipalities.

Campbell acknowledges that it was necessary for the government to have a climate plan in place before attending COP21 in Paris last December, but points out that it has not provided any details since the November announcement.  This leaves a lot of unanswered questions about the unintended consequences of the plan, such as how municipalities will replace their reduced tax bases and address increased operating costs, how workers will be retrained, and what steps will be put in place to ensure Albertans have reliable and affordable electricity.  Most important, the government has not revealed the calculations that led to its assurances of “minimal impact.”

“Alberta can be a real leader when it comes to climate change technology,” says Campbell. ”Large industrial CO2 emitters have been paying into a fund established by the Climate Change and Emissions Management Act nine years ago. None of that has been invested into clean coal technology, which we are seeing as increasingly viable.  As well, while the key role to be played by carbon capture and storage technologies was acknowledged at the Paris meetings, our government appears unwilling to build on the success of investments here in Alberta.”

“Alberta could develop, patent and sell technology developed here to the really large global emitters like China and India, where coal is going to continue to be used for decades. That’s real climate leadership, and it creates jobs and opportunities for Albertans.”

ACT for the Future and the Coal Association of Canada are funded by the membership, including mining companies, shippers, unions, miners and the municipalities supported by mining.

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Also available: ACT Backgrounder

Media inquiries:

Sarah Hamilton

Director of Communications and Media Relations

Coal Association of Canada

o. (780) 757-9488
c. (780) 903-5752

Now Selling Individual Memberships

The Coal Association of Canada is pleased to announce we are now selling individual memberships. This new membership category is designed to include our partners who work in the coal industry and would like to be kept informed about news and events, as well as connecting a network of industry professionals. Read more about a Coal Association of Canada membership here.

PwC: “Mining Industry is vital to British Columbia”

PwC’s 47th annual British Columbia Mining Survey outlines the financial results of BC’s mining industry in 2014.

BC’s mining industry continues to prove its resilience and demonstrate its commitment to sustainability and stakeholder engagement amid a number of challenges presented in the past year. Lower commodity prices remain the primary threat to profitability in the industry. The steady and continuous drop in the price of many metals and minerals has led to reduced revenues and margins, which in turn has meant lower overall spending and investment across the sector.

A handful of mines were put on care and maintenance in 2014, as companies cope with the current price slump. Some capital projects were also delayed, as companies decided to hold off on advancement until prices start to recover.

This drop in activity is evident in the financial results of companies in our 2014 survey of BC mining companies. Gross revenues fell to $8.2 billion in 2014, compared to $8.5 billion in 2013. Net income before taxes came in at $288 million, down considerably from $1.4 billion in 2013, amid a drop in prices for key metals produced in the province, particularly coal. Spending also fell as companies continued to hunker down and weather the ongoing market volatility. Capital expenditures, for example, fell to $1.5 billion, compared to $1.8 billion in 2013.

Mining is a cyclical business. Miners know this better than most and many are taking appropriate measures to try to maintain profitability, while at the same time ensuring their operations are sustainable for the long-term, for when commodity prices do eventually recover.

Read more: Proving Resilient: the Mining Industry in British Columbia in 2014 (PwC)

EIA: “Coal to dominate through to 2040”

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects coal to remain the primary US generating fuel through 2040 even though natural gas should increase its share and wind power could overtake output from conventional hydropower generation, according to the Annual Energy Outlook released today.The share of coal in electricity generation should reach 42pc in 2020, up from 41pc in 2013, before declining steadily to 37pc in 2040, according to the outlook’s reference case scenario. The numbers exclude combined heat and power and own-use generation.

Gas’ share in primary generation for the grid is projected to decline to 22pc in 2020, from 24pc in 2013, before it rises to 27pc in 2040. Nuclear plants’ share falls to 18pc in 2040 from 21pc in 2013.

Electricity generation from coal-fired plants in absolute terms should increase at 0.3pc/yr in 2015-40. Gas generation likely will expand at 1.1pc/yr while nuclear plants’ output will rise at 0.2pc/yr.

A crucial caveat in the outlook is that it does not take into account the significant projected impacts to coal generation from the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed Clean Power Plan, which would impose CO2 emission cuts on the US power sector. The proposal is likely to accelerate the retirements in the US coal fleet. The EIA outlooks do not reflect government policies and regulations that have not been enacted. The agency is working on an analysis of the CO2 reduction proposal and will release it later this year, EIA administrator Adam Sieminski said last year.

Coal’s share in installed generation is projected to decline sharply even without the effects of the CO2 reduction proposal. The EIA outlook projects coal-fired capacity in primary generation will fall to 253GW in 2040 from 296GW in 2013. The share of coal in installed generation should drop to 22pc from 30pc in 2013. The numbers reflect summer capacity of coal-fired plants.

The agency dialed back its projections for rising gas share and falling coal share from last year’s projections, after concluding that US electricity demand will be lower than expected while natural gas prices should increase at a faster pace than the EIA projected in its 2014 outlook.

Renewable resources’ share of US electricity generation likely will increase to 18pc in 2040 from 13pc in 2013, based on the outlook’s reference case scenario. The federal energy statistics agency includes conventional hydropower in its definition of renewables. The share of hydropower in total output peaks at 7.2pc in 2020 but falls to 6.5pc in 2040.

Wind’s share in total output rises steadily from 4.4pc in 2013 to 7pc in 2040, when it overtakes conventional hydropower as the primary renewable resource. Solar photovoltaic output directly connected to the grid should account for 1pc of total output in 2040, up from 0.2pc in 2013.

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Coal is critical in energy generation.

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Without coal, there is no steel.

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Coal is a vital Canadian resource.

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